skip to main content
phone facebook email twitter youtube trophy

Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Bryn Tawe

Correspondence

School Uniform

The official school uniform gives our pupils as members of Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Bryn Tawe the opportunity to be proud of their school, giving them a sense of belonging and to be prepared to maintain high standards of behaviour and commitment to the work and aims of the school. We have high expectations in terms of uniform and every pupil is expected to conform to these rules.

Official School Uniform

Boys

  • Plain black shoes.  Trousers must cover any plain  black “boots” worn.
  • Plain dark socks.
  • Plain black trousers. Jeans(including skinny jeans), cords, skinny lycra trousers or combat trousers of any kind are not permitted.
  • White cotton polo shirt with school logo.
  • Navy sweatshirt with school logo only.
  • Official school hoodie, black or navy.
  • Plain black or navy coat. Leather or imitation leather coats are not permitted.

Girls

  • Plain black shoes. Trousers must cover any plain black “boots” worn. Heels over 4cm are not permitted.
  • Plain dark socks or black tights without a pattern.
  • Plain black trousers.Jeans (including skinny jeans), cords, skinny lycra trousers or combat trousers of any kind are not permitted.
    Plain black knee length skirt. Tight elasticated skirts are not permitted.
  • White cotton polo shirt with school logo.
  • Navy sweatshirt with school logo only.
  • Official school hoodie, black or navy.
  • Plain black or navy coat. Leather or imitation leather coats are not permitted.

Official Physical Education uniform

Boys

  • Suitable training shoes or rugby/football boots.
  • Official school socks, maroon with sky blue stripe / white training socks.
  • Football shorts / rugby shorts navy with school logo.
  • Official school sweat trousers.
  • Sky blue polo short with school logo.
  • Official school rugby shirt, maroon and light blue with school logo.

Girls

  • Suitable training shoes.
  • Official school socks, maroon with sky blue stripe / white training socks.
  • Football shorts / shorts navy school logo.
  • Official school sweat trousers.
  • Sky blue polo short with school logo.
  • PE jumper maroon with school logo.

Appearance expectations

Jewellery

Only the following is acceptable: a wrist watch, one pair of plain studs at the bottom of the ear, one plain ring on one finger. Jewellery is not permitted to be worn on any other part of the body for Health and Safety reasons.

Makeup

Pupils are not permitted to wear makeup, false eyelashes or fake tan. Nail varnish and nail extensions are not permitted.

Hair

Unnatural hair colour or extreme fashion styles are not permitted. The school will decide on what is extreme. An extreme style can include, shaved head, tramlines, dreadlocks, extensions etc.

Thick and or colourful hairbands / clips are not permitted – navy or plain black only.

The school decides what is acceptable in terms of uniform and appearance.

If pupils do not comply disciplinary action will follow.

Parent information

One Hour Parents Session

To be successful at school, students need a healthy dose of the following:

  • Self-motivation
  • Ability to remember many pieces of information
  • A revision strategy
  • Support from home

Without these key ingredients, success becomes more difficult.

As adults, we are well aware of the importance of learning but students don’t necessarily have the motivation to do their best.

It is up to us to provide the structure and support necessary for their success.

Who are we, and what do we do?

Our UK wide seminars have been developed and fine-tuned over the last sixteen years by a team of educational professionals including teachers and psychologists. They highlight a number of proven strategies that enable students to make learning easier and more productive. On average, 90% of attendees rate the seminars as very good or excellent.

Memorising the little things

School work is full of important things to remember such as lists, random facts, formulae, etc. This information is vital to exam success, but the question is: how can students be expected to remember it all?

We teach a selection of easy to use, fun and effective memory techniques which tap into the brains natural ability. We show the students how to use their imagination in a logical way which enables them to use both sides of the brain as they learn.

THE TECHNIQUES:

  • Mnemonics (e.g. Never Eat Shredded Wheat)
  • Image Chains (placing a list of words into an imaginative story)
  • Peg Words (attaching items to an image that is related to a number)
  • Loci (imagining items in a location in a room etc)
Memorising the big things

Exam success is dependent on more than just remembering selected facts. How can we help

students to remember an entire unit of work?

In order for students to remember something well, they need to make sure that they understand it first. This can be summed up by the mantra: read it, make sense of it, summarise it.

The best method to understand and summarise something is to look for its THEME, MAIN IDEAS and DETAILS:

  • THEME: What is it all about? ;
  • MAIN IDEAS: What are the key ideas?
  • DETAILS: Who? What? Where? When? Why? How?
Condensing & Creative Note-Taking

Long, boring pages of notes are not the most effective way to get the information into the brain quickly. Creative notes such as indented lists, diagrams, or especially, Association Maps (see picture) are much more productive.

They all require imagination, but also require the student to lay out their information in a clear logical way. This ensures that the information is properly understood and is a tool to aid recall, especially when other memory techniques are employed too.

Reviewing

Once they have understood, condensed and memorised their work, students are advised that a review programme should then be implemented. Once they have completed their summary of a unit, they should test themselves. All they need to do is try to draw out their A-maps, diagrams or lists from memory and see how much they can remember. Depending on their preferred learning style they may prefer to say it out loud to themselves.

The more imaginative and logical their summary, the more they will recall first time. They should then make note of the areas they didn’t recall fully (if any) and focus on them – re-read, re-draw, apply memory techniques, etc. After testing themselves the next day, a week later and a month later they should be able to achieve 90% – 100% recall of the information, all for a couple of minutes every day.

HOW TO SUPPORT YOUR CHILD
Encourage your children to follow the review programme. We also looked at time management, so you could encourage them to schedule it alongside homework, coursework and personal time. Perhaps you could provide them with a notice board for their A-Maps, notes, timetables, etc. Encourage the learning and memorising process to be a part of the household. Ensure that they have a suitable space for working, away from distractions. Show them that you are interested in their work; ensure that you are informed about what is expected regarding homework and assignments. From time to time go over their work with them. Give praise for accomplishment and effort, and encourage extra practice in his or her weak areas. Don’t get discouraged! Sometimes the going gets tough; remember to act calm and positive. Don’t let yourself get drawn into arguments and negativity. If a child is angry about school work it is often because they think they can’t do it. It is your job to show them that they can. Remember this:

If you think you can or you think you can’t – you’re right - Henry Ford.

For more information about our range of programmes for years 6 to 13: Call 01883 334551 or visit www.learningperformance.com

Revision support – Parent Flyer

Pupil Deprivation Grant (PDG)

Background

2017 2016 2015
Pupils at Bryn Tawe at the beginning of September 782 789 761
% of pupils eligible for free school meals under 12% under 12% under 11%
Pupil Deprivation Grant £64,400
(4/2017–3/2018)
£69,000
(4/2016–3/2017)
£69,300
(4/2015–3/2016)

Notes for 2017

The Pupil Deprivation Grant (PDG) is directly linked to the number of pupils who receive free school meals (FSM) at the school. Any expenditure from the grant is aimed at raising the standards of pupils who are at risk of underachieving because of poverty and deprivation.

The Sutton Trust is a charitable organization that investigates the effect of additional support aimed at raising the standards of pupils who are at risk of underachieving because of poverty and deprivation. Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Bryn Tawe has adopted a range o strategies recognized by the Sutton Trust as strategies that reinforce the school's aims.

The school has used a wide variety of strategies, specifically to support pupils who face the challenge of poverty and deprivation, including:

  • Appointing a Literacy (Welsh and English) and Numeracy Assistant to design and distribute programmes and activities for targeted pupils including pupils who receive or are eligible to receive FSM.
  • Developing leaders to promote pedagogy and ensure effective staff development within the school. The aim is to ensure that all staff understand the need to overcome the barriers faced by our pupils within society. Specific ADDS sessions are held on improving the quality of teaching in these aspects annually.
  • Freeing 3 members of staff (pastoral leader, KS3 and 4 class teachers) to plant and monitor an intensive mentoring programme with specific interventions to support pupils, including pupils who receive or are eligible to receive FSM, to raise standards in all key stages.
  • All members of staff to prepare a robust mentoring programme to support our pupils' academic progress, including pupils who receive or are eligible to receive FSM, to raise standards in all key stages.
  • Freeing KS3 Literacy (Welsh and English) and Numeracy Co-ordinators, who are experienced teachers, to work with specific groups of pupils on intervention strategies for literacy and numeracy.
  • We have designated an additional learning class in Mathematics, English and Welsh so that we can develop a number of smaller classes. The classes include a number of pupils who are at risk of underachieving because of poverty and deprivation and we therefore expect them to realize their potential.
  • Close collaboration with our primary partner schools on agreed strategies to raise our pupils' literacy and numeracy standards.
  • We have identified a group of KS4 pupils who are at risk of being Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) when they leave school at 16. The majority of these pupils are at risk of underachieving because of poverty and deprivation. They receive regular mentoring sessions to support them to cope with the requirements of various courses, as well as encouraging them to raise their motivation levels to succeed academically.
  • Providing the 'Improvement Room', which is an additional inclusion area to allow pupils with behavioural and emotional needs to receive additional support to succeed.
  • Financial support for FSM pupils to attend extracurricular courses and music lessons to ensure participation in order to raise standards.
  • Developing the school's ICT equipment in order to ensure a full provision for the pupils through balanced funding with the Penderry Ward Communities First grant.
  • Financing an 'Inclusion Officer' in order to provide a very successful inclusion resource which plays a key part in providing continuity in the education of our more vulnerable pupils.
  • We monitor attendance closely, and introduce a wide variety of strategies which include targeting specific pupils who are at risk of underachieving because of poverty and deprivation.

The school's PDG and EIG plans are regularly appraised by the Local Authority.


Notes for 2016

The Pupil Deprivation Grant (PDG) is directly linked to the number of pupils who receive free school meals (FSM) at the school. Any expenditure from the grant is aimed at raising the standards of pupils who are at risk of underachieving because of poverty and deprivation.

The Sutton Trust is a charitable organization that investigates the effect of additional support aimed at raising the standards of pupils who are at risk of underachieving because of poverty and deprivation. Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Bryn Tawe has adopted a range o strategies recognized by the Sutton Trust as strategies that reinforce the school's aims.

The school has used a wide variety of strategies, specifically to support pupils who face the challenge of poverty and deprivation, including:

  • Appointing a Literacy (Welsh and English) and Numeracy Assistant to design and distribute programmes and activities for targeted pupils including pupils who receive or are eligible to receive FSM.
  • Developing leaders to promote pedagogy and ensure effective staff development within the school. The aim is to ensure that all staff understand the need to overcome the barriers faced by our pupils within society. Specific ADDS sessions are held on improving the quality of teaching in these aspects annually.
  • Freeing 3 members of staff (pastoral leader, KS3 and 4 class teachers) to plant and monitor an intensive mentoring programme with specific interventions to support pupils, including pupils who receive or are eligible to receive FSM, to raise standards in all key stages.
  • All members of staff to prepare a robust mentoring programme to support our pupils' academic progress, including pupils who receive or are eligible to receive FSM, to raise standards in all key stages.
  • Freeing KS3 Literacy (Welsh and English) and Numeracy Co-ordinators, who are experienced teachers, to work with specific groups of pupils on intervention strategies for literacy and numeracy.
  • We have designated an additional learning class in Mathematics, English and Welsh so that we can develop a number of smaller classes. The classes include a number of pupils who are at risk of underachieving because of poverty and deprivation and we therefore expect them to realize their potential.
  • Close collaboration with our primary partner schools on agreed strategies to raise our pupils' literacy and numeracy standards.
  • We have identified a group of KS4 pupils who are at risk of being Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) when they leave school at 16. The majority of these pupils are at risk of underachieving because of poverty and deprivation. They receive regular mentoring sessions to support them to cope with the requirements of various courses, as well as encouraging them to raise their motivation levels to succeed academically.
  • Providing the 'Improvement Room', which is an additional inclusion area to allow pupils with behavioural and emotional needs to receive additional support to succeed.
  • Financial support for FSM pupils to attend extracurricular courses and music lessons to ensure participation in order to raise standards.
  • Developing the school's ICT equipment in order to ensure a full provision for the pupils through balanced funding with the Penderry Ward Communities First grant.
  • Financing an 'Inclusion Officer' in order to provide a very successful inclusion resource which plays a key part in providing continuity in the education of our more vulnerable pupils.
  • We monitor attendance closely, and introduce a wide variety of strategies which include targeting specific pupils who are at risk of underachieving because of poverty and deprivation.

The school's PDG and EIG plans are regularly appraised by the Local Authority.


Notes for 2015

The Pupil Deprivation Grant (PDG) is a grant specifically linked to the number of pupils receiving Free School Meals (FSM). Any expenditure of the grant must be applied to the raising of standards of those pupils who are at risk of underachievement due to poverty and deprivation.

The Sutton Trust is a charitable organisation, which carries out research into effective interventions aimed at supporting the raising of standards of those pupils who are at risk of underachievement due to poverty and deprivation. Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Bryn Tawe has adopted a range of strategies identified by the Sutton Trust as effective strategies, which will support us in achieving our desired aims.

The school undertakes the following activities within a wide and extensive range of strategies, particularly in order to support pupils facing the challenges of poverty and deprivation. These include:

  • Appointing teaching assistants to deliver literacy and numeracy catch-up programmes and activities that include targeting pupils who have previously or are currently receiving FSM.
  • Developing leaders to promote pedagogy and ensure effective staff development across the school. The aim is to ensure that all staff understand the need to overcome the obstacles our pupils face within our community. A whole school INSET day was delivered in October 2014 to promote specific strategies to support pupils who have previously or are currently receiving FSM.
  • Appointing 3 teachers (HoKS4 and Deputy HoKS3+4) to plan and monitor a specific mentoring programme with specific interventions to support pupils including pupils who have previously or are currently receiving FSM.
  • Using the KS3 co-ordinators for Literacy (Welsh and English) and Numeracy to plan and provide a catch-up programme for literacy and numeracy skills for pupils including those who have previously or are currently receiving FSM.
  • Appointing an extra teacher in Maths in order to reduce the number of pupils in each KS4 group. These classes include pupils that are at risk of underachievement due to the effects of deprivation and poverty.
  • Collaborating with our primary cluster of schools to develop consistent literacy and numeracy strategies to raise standards for all our pupils, including pupils who have previously or are currently receiving FSM.
  • We have identified a group of pupils in KS4 who are in danger of becoming Not in Education Employment or Training (NEET) upon leaving school at 16. The majority of these pupils are in danger of underachieving due to poverty and deprivation. They receive regular mentoring sessions, which support pupils’ ability to cope with various courses and improve their motivation to achieve.
  • Providing the ‘Hafan’, an additional inclusion facility to support pupils with behavioural and emotional needs.
  • Financial support for pupils that are eligible for FSM to be able to attend extra-curricular courses to improve standards.
  • Developing the ICT provision within the school for pupils, including pupils who have previously or are currently receiving FSM through match funding for a grant from communities first – Penderi Ward.
  • Funding a ‘Family learning officer’ to deliver the family learning signature in order to support families to promote educational success within the home.
  • We monitor attendance by implementing a variety of strategies to target those pupils who are in danger of underachieving due to poverty and deprivation.

The school’s PDG, SEG and WEG Plans are regularly scrutinised by the Governing Body, and monitored by the Local Authority.